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U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM)

U.S. Coast Guard Defines Marine Planning Roles

The Coast Guard has a major role in maintaining the U.S. Marine Transportation System (MTS); the more than 25,000 miles of inland, intracoastal and coastal waterways that connect the United States to the rest of the world and facilitate more than $4.5 trillion in trade every year.

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Training Up: Kadena Squadron Maintains Airmen's Proficiency

The 372nd Training Squadron, Detachment 15, provides different training courses to Kadena's Airmen, including courses involving F-15 Eagle maintenance.

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U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC)

Wayfinder' Earns Schofield Military Spouse Of The Year Honors

This is a cornerstone of Sarah Hutchison's beliefs, which is one of the reasons she won Military Spouse magazine's Military Spouse of the Year for Schofield Barracks.

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Pro Surfers Hang 10' With 25th Id

Maj. David Webb, brigade operations officer assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th ID, helped organize the event for the division.

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U.S. Marine Forces, Pacific (MARFORPAC)

Wwii Veteran Speaks To Netc

Addressing a crowd of over 150 NETC employees in person and through video teleconferencing, Rear Adm. Mike White welcomed retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Cash Barber as a guest speaker for Naval Heritage.
"I'm proud to stand here today and represent just one guy from the greatest generation," said Barber.
Barber's 30-year naval career began when he enlisted in the Navy in May of 1941 as a young 17-year-old from Colorado. On Dec. 18, 1941, Barber and 29 of his shipmates, all recent graduates of Aviation Machinist Mate school, arrived in Pearl Harbor on a cargo ship and witnessed the aftermath of the Japanese attack.
"Folks, it's a sight I'll never forget, we had a battleship laying on its side as we entered the harbor and we went by battleship row and you just can't believe the sight that it was," said Barber. "Since we didn't have any aircraft to be assigned to or take care of, they assigned us to security forces, issued us a rifle, and put us in a foxhole."
Barber described some of the unusual conditions he remembers during the chaotic aftermath of the attack including barbed wire on Waikiki beach.
Replacement aircraft were available by mid-January of 1942 and Barber was assigned to a flight crew and started training with Patrol Squadron (VP) 11 at Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay.
As an aircraft crewmember on the Consolidated Patrol Bomber (PBY) Catalina, Barber served in Pacific battles from Midway to the Philippines. He described the versatility of the PBY as a workhorse seaplane capable of dropping bombs and rescuing downed pilots.
The PBYs operated among the many islands in the Pacific and off of a seaplane tender, USS Curtiss (AV 4), to support the Marines and the Army. Barber's squadron returned to San Diego at the end of 1942. After a short period of leave and training, the squadron received orders back to the Pacific in April 1943.
From the end of 1943 through mid-1944, the PBY Catalinas in Barber's squadron were painted flat black and flew night assaults against the Japanese fleet using star sightings for night navigation. Referred to as Black Cat Operations, the stealth seaplanes took off at sunset and landed at sunrise.
"I didn't get back home again for 20 months that time the great thing about that second trip was the Black Cats.. what a great change in weather," Barber said.
Each PBY had a nine-man crew consisting of three pilots, a radarman, a radioman, a flight engineer, a 2nd mechanic, and two ordnance men.
"Flying at night, with the latest radar, we had a picnic because we could pick up ships 50 to 60 miles away and then hone in on them. We could see their wake in the water, with all the beautiful colors, and they couldn't see us. We had to identify our contact and to identify them, we would drop a parachute flare," said Barber. "The parachute flare would get shot out before it burned out and they knew exactly what was going to happen next. we would turn the tables on them."
VP-11 received numerous message dispatches from Commander Aircraft Seventh Fleet in August and September 1944 commending them for their continued success in finding and hitting the enemy throughout night operations.
The Black Cats successfully sunk 100,000 tons of enemy shipping and damaged an equal amount of enemy shipping during their WWII operations. Additionally, the Black Cats performed reconnaissance, air-sea rescue, dive bombing, mine laying and torpedo attack missions.
In December 1943, Barber's squadron evacuated 219 Australian commandos, 25 at a time, from their post near Wewak, New Guinea. To accomplish this, the crew had to strip unnecessary equipment and armament and land the 104-foot wingspan PBY on the 200-foot wide Sepik River. Despite a skeleton crew, the PBY used the river current to sweep each aircraft from the muddy riverbank back into the river for take-off.
Barber quickly moved up in rank and after only four years was advanced to Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate in Sept. 1945.
Members of the audience laughed and clapped as Barber concluded his presentation with an entertaining story regarding an open-sea landing requiring a mayday distress call and an unanticipated delivery of 200 cases of beer.
After the presentation, command members lined up to shake Barber's hand and thank him for sharing his stories. "It's not every day that you get to hear a first-hand account of life on Oahu in the days immediately after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor," said Ernie Philips, an operations research analyst in the Resources, Requirements and Assessment department at NETC. As a junior officer, Philips was assigned to VP-11 in 1991 when the squadron was flying P-3 Orion patrol aircraft and located in Brunswick, Maine.
"It was fascinating to hear his stories of the critical role that PBY squadrons played. From the spotting of the Japanese fleet prior to the Battle of Midway to night-time bombing runs when the PBY's were painted all black, his stories brought the history of World War II in the Pacific to life," said Philips.
Commissioned as a limited duty officer (LDO) in 1961, Barber completed 30 years of naval service before retiring in 1971. He moved to the Pensacola area several years ago and at age 92 currently spends one day a week as a volunteer at the National Naval Aviation Museum. If you visit there, you can often find him by the PBY-5A Catalina display. Make sure to ask him about his beer story.
For more information on the National Naval Aviation Museum, visit http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/

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Key Training Develops Current, Future Broncos'

Bronco Soldiers trained on various courses, such as Advanced Physical Fitness, Dismounted Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Devices (RC-IED) lanes, Defense Operations, Machine Gun University (MGU), and Close Quarters Marksmanship (CQM).

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Navy Region Hawaii

94th Aamdc's 3rd Knowlton Awards Ceremony Recognizes Joint Intel Professionalism

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR HICKAM, Hawaii Seven deserving professionals from different headquarters in the Pacific theater were presented the Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton Medal for their significant support and contributions to the Military Intelligence Corps during a ceremony sponsored by the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command intelligence (G2) directorate at the Ka Makani Community Center, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii April 19.

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A Survivor's Story

Retired U.S. Navy Capt. John Woolston, was an engineer assigned to the Indianapolis when it sank, but his history with it began several years before.

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Air Force 15th Wing

94th Aamdc's 3rd Knowlton Awards Ceremony Recognizes Joint Intel Professionalism

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR HICKAM, Hawaii Seven deserving professionals from different headquarters in the Pacific theater were presented the Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton Medal for their significant support and contributions to the Military Intelligence Corps during a ceremony sponsored by the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command intelligence (G2) directorate at the Ka Makani Community Center, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii April 19.

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A Survivor's Story

Retired U.S. Navy Capt. John Woolston, was an engineer assigned to the Indianapolis when it sank, but his history with it began several years before.

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Coast Guard

17th Change Of Command At Joint Interagency Task Force West

Story by Shawn Parrish on 04/01/2017
HONOLULU - Joint Interagency Task Force West held its 17th change of command ceremony bidding farewell to U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Keith M. Smith and welcoming Rear Adm. Donna L. Cottrell, at Camp H. M. Smith, March 31. Smith, a native of Cypress, California, served as the Director of Joint Interagency Task Force West from May 2015 to March 2017. He will be reporting as Commander to U.S. Coast Guard Force Readiness Command, in Norfolk, Virginia.
During Smith's tenure as director, Joint Interagency Task Force West conducted 87 counter narcotics capacity building missions that provided training to more than 1800 partner nation law enforcement members. Tri-lateral counternarcotics' training including both Bangladeshi and Sri Lankan forces was also conducted, the first time a counternarcotics mission has been accomplished in Sri Lanka.
Smith is best known for operationalizing and optimizing the Task Force through a major internal reorganization combining intelligence and operations activities into a single directorate and establishing a new Counter Narcotics Operations Center. During his tenure, Task Force contributions have resulted in the successful seizure of over 140 metric tons of chemical precursors used in the illicit synthesis of methamphetamine, over 3 metric tons of cocaine, and the seizure of illicit funds equivalent to $2 million.
Cottrell is from Wellington, Ohio, with more than 30 years of service. She most recently served as the Deputy to the Assistant Commandant for Capability, sourcing capabilities to meet U.S. Coast Guard mission requirements, and developing service wide policies for equipping and sustaining Coast Guard members.
Both Cottrell and Smith share the distinction among current Coast Guard Admirals of having prior enlisted service before receiving their commission. Smith was a former air crewman, and Cottrell, served as a boatswain's mate and aviation electronics technician.
Joint Interagency Task Force West plans and conducts Department of Defense counterdrug activities in order to increase regional stability and disrupt transnational criminal organizations that threaten global interests in the U.S. Pacific Command area of responsibility. read more

History Accompanies Weekend Kolekole Run

The Kolekole Pass, which sits at an elevation of approximately 1,725 feet, forms a natural cleft in the Waianae mountain range that connects the island's leeward plain to its western coast.

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