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U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM)

Danger! Here Be Dragons; Red Dragons Now Dwell Aboard MCB Hawaii

Story by LCpl Jesus Sepulveda Torres on 07/24/2016
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION KANEOHE BAY A ribbon cutting ceremony was held to commemorate the opening of the newly constructed MV-22 Osprey hangar aboard Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay on July 19, 2016.
This first hangar built since World War II, it now houses Marine Medium Tiltrotor-268, "Red Dragons," on base making them the first Osprey squadron to be stationed in Hawaii.
Andy Snow, a speaker at the ceremony and the construction manager overseeing the MV-22 hangar, said the 58 million dollar project required approximately 50 thousand square feet of earth to be moved and took almost two years to finish.
The hangar area will include a taxiway, a path connecting runways, and an apron, an area for parked aircraft, which will help to support the entire MV-22 squadron.
Senior military leaders such as Col. Sean C. Killeen, the commanding officer of Marine Corps Base Hawaii, members of Hawaii's Congressional delegation and key community partners attended the event.
Killeen, a Mundelein, Ill., welcomed the new MV-22 unit to its new home on MCB Hawaii during the ceremony.
"Marine Medium Tiltrotor-268 is a special unit and although I never had the privilege of being a Red Dragon, I had the honor of flying with them in combat, in Iraq, while they performed the number one cannot-fail mission of, casualty evacuation," he said. "The machines have changed, but the spirit and commitment of the Red Dragons remains the same. We welcome VM-268, the newest addition to our Marine Air Ground Task Force here in Hawaii."
Killeen said the hangar completion is important for the base's operational capabilities and it is much more than just a building.
"This hangar represents more than just bricks, mortar and steel," he said. "True, it will be the home to the Red Dragons, but for the men and women who constructed this hangar, it represents quite the accomplishment a legacy that will endure for quite some time."
He stated how the hangars on base have played crucial roles in the decades they have been used, from the attacks on December 7, 1941, to the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.
"This hangar now joins its sisters on the far end of the flight line as she takes her responsibility of sheltering VM-268's Ospreys and the crews that will maintain them," he said. "She will soon be joined by a sister squadron, Marine Medium Tiltrotor-363, the Red Lions,' in a hangar that is currently being constructed near here."
Mazie Hirono, a Senator and Representative for Hawaii, was one of the guests of honor for the ribbon cutting ceremony. She spoke about the significance of the hangar's construction in the Pacific and how much work it took to complete it.
"With nearly half of the world's population, one-third of the global Gross Domestic Revenue and some of the world's most capable militaries, Asia and the Pacific area is one of the world's most political and economic centers of gravity," said Hirono, a Honolulu, native. "Investments like this hangar and strategic force structuring on Hawaii military installations is our visual commitment to the rebalance."
Hirono said the rebalancing in the Pacific is part of the United States' plan to preserve and enhance a stable and diverse relationship with its allied nations through support from U.S. installations, such as the new MV-22 hangar.
"The MV-22s are not here by chance," she said. "The effort to base two MV-22 squadrons here, and complete the necessary preparations took a lot of work by a lot of us. The Marines, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Watts Contrack and our Congressional delegation all worked together to make this happen, and over the past five years, we have been successful in securing over half a billion dollars in military construction funding, which has supported Navy and Marine Corps operations across the Pacific."
Hirono expressed with how proud she was of the newly built hangar and thanked all the military and civilian personnel involved in its construction.
"Our military ohana is a vital part of our island community, closely involved with our lifestyle and culture," Hirono said. "Never forget that service members, whether they are training at home or whether they are serving in combat missions abroad, are putting their lives in harm's way. I extend a heartfelt mahalo to everyone who helped in the hangar construction and who support our collective mission." read more

Hawaii Army National Guard Hosts Indonesian Air Force For Knowledge Exchange

Story by SPC Paul Berzinas on 07/23/2016
The exchange is part of the State Partnership Program, designed to exchange knowledgebetween the United States and Indonesian service members while strengthening their relationship.
"We're trying to build good relationships in Southeast Asia," said U.S. Army Maj. Joseph O. Tolentino, commander of Army Aviation Support Facilty #1. "I think it's important for us to bridge the gap between America and Indonesia in order to build trust."
Soldiers from HIARNG Company B, 1-171st Aviation Regiment and Indonesian airmenspent time discussinghow best to maintain rotary-wing aircraft, train pilots and maintain equipment.
"We are very lucky to be able to come here and participate in this exchange with the Army," said Col. Eding Sungkana, a helicopter pilot in the Indonesian air force. "We gained a lot of experience, a lot of knowledge, and we hope this exchange will take place every year."
Over the course of the exchange, topics such as maintenance intervals, pilot training standards, and corrosion control were discussed. Briefings were given by service members from both the Hawaii Army National Guard and the Indonesian air force.
"We need to improve our safety practices," said Lt. Col. Arnold Fernando Sittorus, a helicopter pilot with the Indonesian air force. "So we've been working to learn those practices from the Hawaii Army National Guard."
The Hawaii Guard also benefitted from the exchange, with Soldiers getting the chance to learn about Indonesia's humanitarian assistance and disaster response (HA/DR) missions, as well as their best maintenance practices.
"It gave us an idea of how they operate," said Tolentino. "We got a taste of how they respond to search and rescue missions, what types of aircraft they use, and what their maintenance practices are."
Topics discussed during the exchange were decided upon as a result of meetings held between officers from the Indonesian air force and the HIARNG months prior.
"We went to Indonesia and met with the Tentara Nasional Indonesian-Angkatan Udara," said Tolentino. "We came up with a plan and developed a curriculum."
"Overall, we were able to help them with what they wanted to learn," said Tolentino. "They seemed interested and receptive, and at the end of the day, I think we built a strong bond with them."
In addition to the various presentations, the knowledge exchange also included various demonstrations and hands-on activities, to include a demonstration flight in a CH-47F Chinook helicopter.
"I wanted to show them the capabilities of the CH-47," said Tolentino. "I think they had a good experience, and it's great that we were able to bring them out on a flight."
Officers from the Indonesian air force also had a chance to experience the Hawaii Army National Guard's aerial gunnery simulators.
"For many of the Indonesian air force personnel, it was their first time in a simulator like that," said U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Fred T. Dona, the standardization instructor for the CH-47F Chinook helicopter. "I think they really enjoyed virtual helicopter gunnery training."
Even though the service members from the United States and Indonesia came from different cultural backgrounds, they were able to relate through their common professions, solidifying their relationship with one another.
"Wherever you go in the aviation world, it's good to see that there are similarities," said Dona. "These guys come from another country, they speak a different language, but when we talk about aviation it's like we're speaking the same language, and we can relate on that level." read more

U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC)

8th Theater Sustainment Command Changes Leadership

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii -- The Pacific Theater's senior Army logistics unit changed leadership July 8 on Hamilton Field, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

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Sergeant Embraces Role As Army Mentor

"Every class I go through I learn something different," Thy said. "The students don't realize that but I learn how to be a better instructor, a better NCO. I learn how to actually be a public speaker and I go from actually being a terrifying instructor to a counseling, coaching, mentoring instructor. I succeeded when the student has learned something."

read more

U.S. Marine Forces, Pacific (MARFORPAC)

Danger! Here Be Dragons; Red Dragons Now Dwell Aboard MCB Hawaii

Story by LCpl Jesus Sepulveda Torres on 07/24/2016
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION KANEOHE BAY A ribbon cutting ceremony was held to commemorate the opening of the newly constructed MV-22 Osprey hangar aboard Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay on July 19, 2016.
This first hangar built since World War II, it now houses Marine Medium Tiltrotor-268, "Red Dragons," on base making them the first Osprey squadron to be stationed in Hawaii.
Andy Snow, a speaker at the ceremony and the construction manager overseeing the MV-22 hangar, said the 58 million dollar project required approximately 50 thousand square feet of earth to be moved and took almost two years to finish.
The hangar area will include a taxiway, a path connecting runways, and an apron, an area for parked aircraft, which will help to support the entire MV-22 squadron.
Senior military leaders such as Col. Sean C. Killeen, the commanding officer of Marine Corps Base Hawaii, members of Hawaii's Congressional delegation and key community partners attended the event.
Killeen, a Mundelein, Ill., welcomed the new MV-22 unit to its new home on MCB Hawaii during the ceremony.
"Marine Medium Tiltrotor-268 is a special unit and although I never had the privilege of being a Red Dragon, I had the honor of flying with them in combat, in Iraq, while they performed the number one cannot-fail mission of, casualty evacuation," he said. "The machines have changed, but the spirit and commitment of the Red Dragons remains the same. We welcome VM-268, the newest addition to our Marine Air Ground Task Force here in Hawaii."
Killeen said the hangar completion is important for the base's operational capabilities and it is much more than just a building.
"This hangar represents more than just bricks, mortar and steel," he said. "True, it will be the home to the Red Dragons, but for the men and women who constructed this hangar, it represents quite the accomplishment a legacy that will endure for quite some time."
He stated how the hangars on base have played crucial roles in the decades they have been used, from the attacks on December 7, 1941, to the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.
"This hangar now joins its sisters on the far end of the flight line as she takes her responsibility of sheltering VM-268's Ospreys and the crews that will maintain them," he said. "She will soon be joined by a sister squadron, Marine Medium Tiltrotor-363, the Red Lions,' in a hangar that is currently being constructed near here."
Mazie Hirono, a Senator and Representative for Hawaii, was one of the guests of honor for the ribbon cutting ceremony. She spoke about the significance of the hangar's construction in the Pacific and how much work it took to complete it.
"With nearly half of the world's population, one-third of the global Gross Domestic Revenue and some of the world's most capable militaries, Asia and the Pacific area is one of the world's most political and economic centers of gravity," said Hirono, a Honolulu, native. "Investments like this hangar and strategic force structuring on Hawaii military installations is our visual commitment to the rebalance."
Hirono said the rebalancing in the Pacific is part of the United States' plan to preserve and enhance a stable and diverse relationship with its allied nations through support from U.S. installations, such as the new MV-22 hangar.
"The MV-22s are not here by chance," she said. "The effort to base two MV-22 squadrons here, and complete the necessary preparations took a lot of work by a lot of us. The Marines, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Watts Contrack and our Congressional delegation all worked together to make this happen, and over the past five years, we have been successful in securing over half a billion dollars in military construction funding, which has supported Navy and Marine Corps operations across the Pacific."
Hirono expressed with how proud she was of the newly built hangar and thanked all the military and civilian personnel involved in its construction.
"Our military ohana is a vital part of our island community, closely involved with our lifestyle and culture," Hirono said. "Never forget that service members, whether they are training at home or whether they are serving in combat missions abroad, are putting their lives in harm's way. I extend a heartfelt mahalo to everyone who helped in the hangar construction and who support our collective mission." read more

Coast Guard, Navy Medevac Ill Mariner From Sailing Vessel North Of Oahu

A Navy SH-60 helicopter crew from Kaneohe Bay hoisted the mariner aboard the helicopter and returned to Kaneohe Bay where he was transferred in stable condition to awaiting emergency medical personnel for further transport to Castle Medical Center.

read more

Navy Region Hawaii

Keeping Food Safe For Servicemembers During Rimpac

Story by TSgt Aaron Oelrich on 07/22/2016
RIMPAC brings an increased level of activity to the agencies of JBPHH, and the Army PHCD-CENPAC food inspection team is no exception.
According to Army Sgt. Lee Jeanpierre, PHCD-CENPAC lead food inspector, the Army team of eight inspectors normally conducts food inspections of four to five Navy and Army vessels a week.
With the increased mission tempo during RIMPAC, the Army and Air Force team carries out food inspections on three to four vessels per day, totaling approximately 50 to 80 pallets of food each week.
"It is wonderful working with the Air Force," said Jeanpierre. "Instead of having someone come [to Hawaii] on temporary duty, we are able to use members from our sister services to assist us. They are from a preventative medicine background, so they know what sanitary conditions look like, which cuts down on training time."
The team inspects food in three phases. First, it inspects the food vendor's warehouse, looking at each item and examining its quality before it's moved to the vessel.
Next, vendors transport food from their warehouses to the JBPHH docks, where food inspectors check vehicle temperature to ensure food remains fresh during transportation.
Finally, culinary specialists from each vessel help food inspectors examine items and check them against inventory to confirm the order is correct and meets strict quality requirements.
"The food inspectors are important for the safety of the crew," said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Joan Delfon, aboard USS O'Kane (DDG 77). "They check for expired food, bugs or mold growing on the food to keep the crew members of our vessels safe."
According to Jeanpierre, food inspections provide the first line of defense against foodborne illness. In addition to shipboard inspections, they also conduct food safety inspections for all of JBPHH by inspecting all the food vendors on base.
Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. read more

Thunder Over Georgia Air Show To Include Warbirds

Warbirds acts give younger generations the opportunity to see history live in action.

"Our mission, by way of bringing these warbirds to our air show, is to help the generations born after World War II understand exactly what Americans and their allies can and have achieved when they are called to action with a just cause," said Maj. Rex E. Deloach, assistant air show director.

read more

Air Force 15th Wing

Keeping Food Safe For Servicemembers During Rimpac

Story by TSgt Aaron Oelrich on 07/22/2016
RIMPAC brings an increased level of activity to the agencies of JBPHH, and the Army PHCD-CENPAC food inspection team is no exception.
According to Army Sgt. Lee Jeanpierre, PHCD-CENPAC lead food inspector, the Army team of eight inspectors normally conducts food inspections of four to five Navy and Army vessels a week.
With the increased mission tempo during RIMPAC, the Army and Air Force team carries out food inspections on three to four vessels per day, totaling approximately 50 to 80 pallets of food each week.
"It is wonderful working with the Air Force," said Jeanpierre. "Instead of having someone come [to Hawaii] on temporary duty, we are able to use members from our sister services to assist us. They are from a preventative medicine background, so they know what sanitary conditions look like, which cuts down on training time."
The team inspects food in three phases. First, it inspects the food vendor's warehouse, looking at each item and examining its quality before it's moved to the vessel.
Next, vendors transport food from their warehouses to the JBPHH docks, where food inspectors check vehicle temperature to ensure food remains fresh during transportation.
Finally, culinary specialists from each vessel help food inspectors examine items and check them against inventory to confirm the order is correct and meets strict quality requirements.
"The food inspectors are important for the safety of the crew," said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Joan Delfon, aboard USS O'Kane (DDG 77). "They check for expired food, bugs or mold growing on the food to keep the crew members of our vessels safe."
According to Jeanpierre, food inspections provide the first line of defense against foodborne illness. In addition to shipboard inspections, they also conduct food safety inspections for all of JBPHH by inspecting all the food vendors on base.
Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. read more

Thunder Over Georgia Air Show To Include Warbirds

Warbirds acts give younger generations the opportunity to see history live in action.

"Our mission, by way of bringing these warbirds to our air show, is to help the generations born after World War II understand exactly what Americans and their allies can and have achieved when they are called to action with a just cause," said Maj. Rex E. Deloach, assistant air show director.

read more

Coast Guard

Coast Guard Upgrades Port Condition For Eastern Hawaiian Islands Ahead Of Darby

Maritime industry partners, the boating public and visitors are encouraged to prepare accordingly.

Due to the gale force winds generated by Darby expected within 48 hours, waterfront facilities should remove potential flying debris, hazardous materials and oil pollution hazards from dockside areas. Additionally, all hazardous materials and potential sources of pollution are to be secured due to anticipated heavy rain runoff.

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Royal New Zealand Air Force Meets With Plane Crash Survivors They Helped Rescue During Rimpac 2016

MARINE CORPS BASE HAWAII (July 20, 2016) Service members from the Royal New Zealand Air Force No. 5 Air Squadron met with survivors of a July 15 plane crash that occurred off the coast of Kona, Hawaii, on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, July 20.

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